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Here is a study done at the University of Minnesota regarding the actual cost of raising children.

 

http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/businessmanagement/DF5899.html

 

I'd like to thank Harry for bringing this study to my attention!


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bjsmith

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Again this is a excellent empowerment tool  by a member of IowaFathers that is giving push to help correct this BROKEN system.  Hats off to you Harry   and the hidden support of Amie  It's member that make this website work and it's research like this that help to find a way to fix the system.  Thanks from the staff.

 

B.J.

 

Roland

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If you look at http://www.babycenter.com they have a cost of raising a child calculator. Also on the website  http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/Crc/crc2001.pdf has some good information about raising children.

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Makes you wonder what the rest of the money we pay is being used for, actualy I can tell you mine goes for Booze, drugs, and cigarettes.


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There has been research into support accountability from other states and to see where we stand within this state.  By all means this is one of the issues that will be looked at by the legislative committee.

 

B.J.

bjsmith

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here is an excerpt from msn money http://moneycentral.msn.com/articles/family/kids/tlkidscost.asp

The Cost of Raising Children
 The table below shows the estimated annual costs of raising a child, based on a survey by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The table shows costs based on a family with two children on a per-child basis. The data comes from the Consumer Expenditure Survey by the U.S. Department of Labor, conducted from 1990-92.The figures have been updated to 2001 dollars using the Consumer Price Index.

The USDA ends its cost survey when a child legally becomes an adult at age 18. It does not include any estimates for sending your children to college nor does it offer any cost estimates if your child remains in your home as a dependent after the age of 18. The College Board reports that in the 1998-99 school year, a resident student at a four-year private college will spend about $23,578 a year; a student at a public college will pay $9,008 a year.

See the footnotes¹ below for further information. If you're a single-parent family, use the Single-Parent Family table.
  


Dual-Parent Family Age
of Child Housing Food Transportation Clothing Health Child care/
Education Miscellaneous Total
Before-tax income: up to $39,100
0 to 2 2,500 910 780 370 460 840 630 6490
3 to 5 2,470 1,010 750 360 440 820 680 6,630
6 to 8 2,380 1,300 880 400 510 560 680 6,710
9 to 11 2,150 1,560 950 450 560 340 720 6,730
12 to 14 2,400 1,640 1,070 750 560 240 900 7,560
15 to 17 1,940 1,780 1,440 660 600 400 660 7,480
Total 41,520 24,600 17,610 8,970 9,390 9,990 12,720 124,800
 
Before-tax income: $39,100 to $65,800
0 to 2 3,380 1,090 1,160 430 610 1,380 980 9,030
3 to 5 3,350 1,260 1,130 420 580 1,530 990 9,260
6 to 8 3,260 1,600 1,260 470 660 980 1,030 9,260
9 to 11 3,030 1,890 1,330 520 720 640 1,250 9,190
12 to 14 3,280 1,900 1,450 870 720 470 1,250 9,940
15 to 17 2,820 2,110 1,840 780 770 810 1,010 10,140
Total 57,360 29,550 24,510 10,470 12,180 17,430 18,960 170,460
 
Before-tax income: $65,800 and up
0 to 2 5,370 1,440 1,630 570 700 2,090 1,630 13,430
3 to 5 5,340 1,630 1,600 560 670 2,270 1,650 13,720
6 to 8 5,250 1,970 1,720 610 770 1,560 1,690 13,570
9 to 11 5,020 2,290 1,800 670 820 1,090 1,720 13,410
12 to 14 5,270 2,400 1,920 1,100 830 840 1,900 13,170
15 to 17 4,810 2,530 2,330 1,000 870 1,470 1,660 14,670
Total 93,180 36,780 33,000 13,530 13,980 27,960 30,750 249,180


Single-Parent Family Age
of Child Housing Food Transportation Clothing Health Child care/
Education Miscellaneous Total
Before-tax income: up to $39,100
0 to 2 2,240 1,010 730 330 220 530 380 5,440
3 to 5 2,550 1,060 640 350 330 720 500 6,150
6 to 8 2,710 1,340 740 410 390 650 670 6,910
9 to 11 2,600 1,550 530 420 490 310 540 6,440
12 to 14 2,600 1,550 620 710 520 400 520 6,920
15 to 17 2,760 1,690 970 830 520 300 600 7,670
Total 46,380 24,600 12,690 9,150 7,410 8,730 9,630 118,590
 
Before-tax income: $39,100 and up
0 to 2 4,820 1,560 2,220 470 510 1,290 1,580 12,450
3 to 5 4,820 1,650 2,130 500 690 1,620 1,690 13,410
6 to 8 5,290 1,980 2,240 570 790 1,510 1,870 14,250
9 to 11 5,180 2,380 2,030 580 950 880 1,740 13,740
12 to 14 5,190 2,380 2,110 950 1,000 1,260 1,720 14,560
15 to 17 5,340 2,470 2,290 1,090 990 1,030 1,800 15,010
Total 92,850 37,110 39,060 12,480 14,790 22,770 31,200 250,260
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture. Estimates are based on 1990-92 Consumer Expenditure Survey updated to 2001 dollars using the Consumer Price Index.


¹ The figures represent estimated expenses on the younger child in a two-child family. Estimates are about the same for the older child, so a family of two would then double the total cost. Thus, a family with two children and an income of less than $39,100, could expect to spend somewhere around $249,600, for two children by the time they each had reached age 18. If you have only one child, the USDA assumes you'll spend slightly more on that child and suggests multiplying the total expense for the appropriate age category by 1.24. If you have three or more children, the USDA assumes you'll spend slightly less per child. To estimate expenses for each child in a family with three or more children, multiply the total expense for each appropriate age category by 0.77. For expenses on all children in a family, these totals should be summed.

KenRichards

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Reply with quote  #7 
It does cost more to raise a child according to Jean Strahan. 

According to the Newark Star-Ledger, Jean Strahan (Michael Strahan's ex wife) filed a motion in Essex County (N.J.) family court last week saying she cannot afford her 30-room mansion -- which includes an in-home theater -- in Montclair, N.J., despite the fact she has a $3.7 million interest-bearing account with Smith Barney.

Quick calculations indicate she profits $30,800 per month from such an account and still retains the 3.7 million dollars for future use.  Furthermore, before she left her husband she transferred the bulk of his savings to other accounts - a better way to put it is she stole the money before slamming him for the remaining money.  My football experts tell me she got another 20 million from him before getting "half" of his windfall earnings.

I have to wonder, if she has a 20 room mansion and known income of $31,000 per month and already took 50% of his assets why is she doing this?

#1 - because she can and she thinks she can get more money
#2 - because courts never penalize the greedy (except I see Judge Judy do it but she is my hero)
#3 - because she is still angry and wants to destroy him
 
I believe the next headline for such a gold digger could be along the lines of Biggie or 2PAC.  It is a logical progression if you consider the culture and the greed.  She isn't going to let her ex have any peace and he may someday retaliate OJ style.
bitfre

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Reply with quote  #8 

I looked at the daycare expense and it doesn't look accurate to me. $195 per month is barerly covering my daughter's weekly daycare bill. Currently my visitation court order is ordering me to pay full daycare and pay child support on top of that. Average daycare bill is $500/month. After looking at the UMN numbers, it looks like I am covering the whole cost to raise my daughter and we have shared custody (50/50). Do you think this guidline will actually be used anytime soon to set child support?


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Originally Posted by Bryan

Here is a study done at the University of Minnesota regarding the actual cost of raising children.

http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/businessmanagement/DF5899.html

I'd like to thank Harry for bringing this study to my attention!
ashleyjohn

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Reply with quote  #9 
It varies from country to country. In an average middle-income American family, it estimated around $245,340.
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Masha

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Reply with quote  #10 

It turns less expensive, in case you have a lot of relatives who willingly support you and buy you the stuff for the baby 
you may cut the bills by breastfeeding (to sober limits) and buying the pre-owned stuff

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